Untogether will premiere at Tribeca Film Festival 2018 (April 23)

Untogether will premiere at Tribeca Film Festival 2018 (April 23)

The Tribeca Film Festival on Wednesday revealed the feature film lineup for its 17th edition, which is set to take place in April in New York.

SPOTLIGHT NARRATIVE
Supported by HSBC
The Spotlight Narrative section is a launching pad for exciting new independent premieres with a focus on marquee filmmakers and performers.

Untogether, directed and written by Emma Forrest. Produced by Scott LaStaiti, Luke Daniels, Brandon Hogan. (USA) — World Premiere. Former writing prodigy Andrea tries not to fall for her one-night stand, while her sister Tara throws herself into a newfound religious zeal (and the arms of her charismatic rabbi) to avoid the truth about her current relationship in this multi-character romantic drama. With Jamie Dornan, Jemima Kirke, Lola Kirke, Ben Mendelsohn, Billy Crystal, Alice Eve, Jennifer Grey, Scott Caan.

News

News

The premiere of Replicas was postponed to 24 August 2018.
The information made available by Exhibitor Relations and IMDb has also changed the release date on its site.
Starring: Alice Eve, Thomas Middleditch & Keanu Reeves.

The Stolen Screen captures

The Stolen Screen captures

Set in 1860, Charlotte Lockton (Alice Eve: Star Trek In Darkness, Entourage) has settled in the South Island of New Zealand with her wealthy husband, David (Lucas Hinch: Nothing Personal) during the Gold Rush. Blissful beginnings are suddenly shaken as Charlotte’s world is turned upside down and her circumstances are drastically altered. Frustrated with the apathy of the authorities, she decides to take on a journey of discovery and strength to track him down alone.When her son is kidnapped she joins a convoy of ex-cons, prostitutes and Maori warriors heading for the rough mining community of Gold Town. There she meets Joshua McCullen (Jack Davenport: Kingsman: The Secret Service, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Wild Wedding), the owner of the town and a man who is pivotal to uncovering the truth behind the disappearance of her son.

Gallery Links:

INICIO > MOVIE PRODUCTIONS > THE STOLEN > SCREEN CAPTURES

Alice Eve Will Join Season Two of Marvel’s Iron Fist

Alice Eve Will Join Season Two of Marvel’s Iron Fist

Alice Eve is set to appear in “Iron Fist” Season 2 on Netflix, Variety has learned exclusively.

Eve’s role in the series is being kept under wraps, but she joins a returning cast that includes series star Finn Jones along with Jessica Henwick, Tom Pelphrey, Jessica Stroup, and Sacha Dhawan. An English actress who has appeared in film, television, and theatre, Eve is best known to American audiences for her role as Carol Marcus in the film “Star Trek: Into Darkness.” She also recently appeared in the third season of “Black Mirror” and the Lionsgate film “Misconduct.” She will also co-star in the Dakota Fanning-led film “Please Stand By,” due to be released in theaters in January.

“We are very excited to have an actress of Alice’s stature join the cast of ‘Marvel’s Iron Fist,’” said Marvel’s head of television and series executive producer Jeph Loeb. “Her exceptional talent brings an intrigue and danger to her character unlike anyone else.”

Eve is repped by Independent Talent Group in the U.K and CAA and Untitled Entertainment in the U.S.

“Iron Fist” stars “Game of Thrones” alum Jones as Danny Rand, the heir to the multi-billion dollar Rand Corp. who returns to New York after training in martial arts for years in the mysterious city of K’un-Lun. Through his training, he was chosen to be the living weapon known as the Iron Fist, which allows him to channel his chi energy into his fists. It was the fourth Marvel-Netflix series to be released. The show was preceded by “Daredevil,” “Jessica Jones,” and “Luke Cage.” All four main characters then teamed up for “The Defenders” event series, which debuted on Netflix in August.

Season 2 will also see Raven Metzner take over as showrunner from Scott Buck, who left “Iron Fist” to work on the Marvel-ABC series “Inhumans.”

Alice Eve Talks About Starring in and Producing Her Brother’s Film ‘Bees Make Honey’

Alice Eve Talks About Starring in and Producing Her Brother’s Film ‘Bees Make Honey’

“Bees Make Honey,” the stylish debut from writer/director Jack Eve, is a true family affair. His sister Alice Eve (“Star Trek: Into Darkness,” “Black Mirror”) headlines the cast, while their father, Trevor Eve (“Troy”), is featured in a supporting role. Pic mixes 1930s period decor with modern music, flashy photography and energetic editing in a dark comedy. Alice Eve spoke with Variety about her work on “Bees Make Honey.”

How did “Bees Make Honey” originate?

It was born out of my brother’s wild imagination and his love for movies in general. He knows me very well, and knew I’d be well suited to the part. There are bits that are certainly inspired by films we’ve loved, but this is his creation.

What was it like working with your brother considering that it was his feature debut, and you’re one of the producers?

My focus was on giving exactly the performance that he desired to see on screen, and being there for him if he needed anything from a creative standpoint. And as a producer, I was trying to keep the film moving along as efficiently as possible.

Your character in “Bees Make Honey” is fascinating because you play off of the inherently theatrical qualities of the narrative, and yet there’s still a sense of modernity. What was that like for you as an actress?
It was exciting! My greatest joy in life comes from entertaining other people, and making them happy. My character grounds the narrative, especially when it gets stylistically crazy. I’m a big believer in truth, so it’s always about finding the truth in any given scene or moment that appeals to me as an actress.

When did you first get interested in acting? Do you have any favorite films, or movies that have inspired you?

I’m a huge fan of classic cinema, and both of my parents are actors, so it was incredible to have dinnertime conversations about the craft and business, as I was definitely interested early on. I love “Chinatown,” and Faye Dunaway is one of my favorite actresses. I could watch Marilyn Monroe or Carole Lombard any day of the week, and I remember David Lean’s “Summertime” with Katharine Hepburn making a big impression on me when I was younger.

Considering that you’re one of the producers of “Bees Make Honey,” what was the biggest challenge?

We made the film for a half a million pounds [around $664,000], and thanks to an extremely dedicated and passionate crew, we squeezed every dollar for all its worth. There was a lot of blood, sweat and tears on this production, and it was a true collaborative journey to get it made. And when you work with family, emotions are involved and run high, and you don’t want to disappoint anyone. There was a belief in each other that was required. My brother loved everyone on the crew, and nobody got paid their full quote. It’s a labor of love.

source

Alice Eve: “Women in film should remain hopeful”

Alice Eve: “Women in film should remain hopeful”

“I love those badass women from times of yore,” says Alice Eve over the phone from her home in Los Angeles. “I like the ones battling the elements. I think that’s pretty cool.”

With this in mind, it’s not surprising that the English actress enjoyed her most recent role in The Stolen, a Western adventure about a women’s thrilling journey to find her kidnapped son.

Eve plays Charlotte Lockton, the wife of a wealthy landowner in 1860s New Zealand, whose happy life is shattered when an intruder murders her husband and makes off with their one-year-old baby. Unhappy with the efforts of local police, Lockton takes it upon herself to track down her child, meeting prostitutes, ex-convicts and Maori warriors along the way. Directed by Niall Johnson, The Stolen also stars Jack Davenport of Kingsman: The Secret Service fame and Graham McTavish from The Hobbit.“It really appealed to me as a story,” says Eve, the 35-year-old star of Star Trek: Into the Darkness. “The simple idea that a woman goes to a new world and not only has her husband taken, but loses her child too. I thought that was a really extreme thing for someone to go through.”

Needless to say, her character, who has to cross the plains of New Zealand alone in the film, lived up to Eve’s feminist expectations. And one of the locations was the Antipodes Islands, a cluster of volcanic rocks five hundred miles south of New Zealand, so there were plenty of chances to battle against the elements. The area is so remote that the islands have no indigenous mammals, only birds.

Eve regales stories of “daily disasters” as a result of filming in the wilderness in winter. “I found it hard with a crew so I can only imagine what it would have been like 170 years ago.” That didn’t stop her from getting stuck in, however, which included doing her own stunts. After successfully filming a scene on a rearing horse, she pleaded with the director to let her do the final take in which her character gallops down a beach into the distance. It was not to be: “They wanted a stunt girl to do it and I was just so devastated that I had a little cry,” she admits with a laugh. “Anyway, they were right in the end because when I practised the horse got out from under me.”As the daughter of the actors Trevor Eve and Sharon Maughan, Alice Eve grew up between England and the US, briefly attending the same school as Paris Hilton in LA. She returned to the UK when she was 12 and was sent to Bedales boarding-school where she had her first taste of acting as Olivia in Twelfth Night.

After that came Oxford at the insistence of her father who wanted her to go to university before running back to LA for auditions. She read English at St Catherine’s (her dissertation was on Wordsworth) before bagging a part in Richard Eyre’s film Stage Beauty in 2004. Since then, her myriad of roles have included Sex and the City 2, Black Mirror and the third Men in Black movie.

While acting has taken her all over the world, this was her first time in New Zealand and she was beguiled by both the magical landscape and the country’s attitudes towards women.

Citing the recent appointment of Jacinda Ardern, the country’s new female Labour Prime Minister, Eve explains that while there people gave her a certain “look in the eye” that made her feel like “what I brought to the table mattered, not my gender”.

“It was one of the first countries to give all women the vote in 1893 and I found there to be very little gender divide in terms of attitudes and their approach to daily life. There don’t seem to be the same problems there that we encounter in Europe and the West.”One of her theories for this is that, unlike the predominately married and pregnant women who travelled to America on the Mayflower, the women who immigrated to New Zealand were nearly exclusively single. “I think that made a big difference to the founding of the country. These single women had to fight their own fight.”

This is a particularly poignant observation in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein and Westminster sexual harassment scandals that have dominated the news in recent weeks. Has she had any experience of sexism in her line of work?

“No, I was not subjected to anything like that, but I think it’s reprehensible for what [Harvey Weinstein] has done and horrible and disgusting to read about.”

However, she thinks that the swell of anger from women around the world is down to “centuries of repression” and, crucially, the gender pay gap. “It’s not great that we’re not paid the same, is it? Pay inequality seems to be across the board… which is really demoralising for the collective.”

While Eve doesn’t want to get bogged down in “boring” discussions about pay within the film industry but she does think that things are changing. Casting directors are more willing to talk about it. She also has a “badass” female manager (is there a theme here?) who went to Harvard Law and fights her corner.

Maybe this shift is why Eve ultimately feels optimistic. “I can’t change anything personally but we should remain hopeful, open and honest, like you should about everything life.”

The Stolen is in selected cinemas now

source