Alice Eve Says She Went Through a ‘Rebirth’ After Her Divorce

Alice Eve Says She Went Through a ‘Rebirth’ After Her Divorce

A new woman. Alice Eve revealed the changes she went through following her divorce.
“I think that after divorce, I took my life a little bit more seriously, because you have to face endings in a way that you maybe never — death in one thing, but an ending in your own chapter. It’s so clearly placed there for you with divorce,” the 36-year-old actress told Us Weekly exclusively at the 2018 Women in Film Max Mara Face of the Future Award Recipient event on Tuesday, June 12. “So after that, things that I thought were frivolous or dismissed, like, ‘My hair is my hair,’ I was like, ‘Let’s look at the hair. What should it be? I can choose it.’ So yeah, there’s a bit more choice and ownership after divorce, I think.”
Eve detailed which parts of her life she paid more attention to after her split from Alex Cowper-Smith. “You look at relationships, friendships, things you spend your time on. In a way you want to be. I looked forward suddenly and was like, ‘Where do I want to be at 45? What do I want to have in my life or not have in my life?’” she said. “Because actually, I know that life has its own twists and turns, but you can try and make some plans, and some of them do come to fruition.”
She added: “You can kind of streamline a little bit. I think I valued my family a lot more and didn’t take it for granted. Yeah, it was a rebirth.” (The high school sweethearts wed in December 2014 and split two years later.)
Eve’s role in the upcoming film Replicas, which is set to be released in August, helped her cope with the changes in her own world because her character experienced something similar. “It was interesting, because I had just gone through a divorce, and so after divorce, you have to be reborn, or God help you,” she explained. “Yes, so there was a lot of conversation on set about the rebirth of my character. … And it was nice to be reborn.” The Brit stars alongside Keanu Reeves in the movie about a man who tries to bring his family members back to life after an accident.

The Star Trek: Into Darkness actress told Us she found romance again, but it took going outside the U.S. “Leave. Leave if you’re single,” she quipped. “I have a boyfriend in New Zealand. That’s my answer.”

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LITHGOW SAINT

In this 11 minute short film Alice Eve and Jason Isaacs lock horns whilst exploring the dynamic between a penetrative, fictional, male talk show host – Lithgow Saint – and the female interviewee – actor Amelia Adams. Written and Directed by Jack Eve.

Alice Eve’s Comedy ‘Bees Make Honey’ Set for July Release

Alice Eve’s Comedy ‘Bees Make Honey’ Set for July Release

RELEASE DATE

Kew Media has set a July 2 VOD release in North America and the U.K. for the dark comedy “Bees Make Honey” from writer-director Jack Eve, starring his sister Alice Eve and father Trevor Eve, Variety has learned exclusively.

The film, set in 1935, also stars Hermione Corfield, Joséphine de La Baume, Wilf Scolding, Joshua McGuire, Anatole Taubman and Ivanno Jeremiah. Alice Eve plays a character desperately attempting to solve the murder of her husband by recreating the exact circumstances a year later.

“Bees Make Honey” is the debut feature film from Jack Eve, whose short film “Lithgow Saint” premiered at Toronto International Film Festival and was acquired by Curzon Cinemas in the UK.
“Bees Make Honey” is an Xploseve Production in association with Flexibon Films, produced by Jack Eve and AJ Riach. Steve Clark-Hall, Jonathan Feuer, David Moores, Babatunde Soyoye, Rodney Dukes, Jeremy Davidson, Alice Eve and Paul J Morrissey serve as executive producers

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Interview with Alice Eve

It literally took me all day to read the three scripts… so from the off I was hooked.
Alice Eve

How would you describe Gwenda?

The first word that springs to mind to describe Gwenda is ‘desperate’, I don’t think Gwenda is desperate herself but she is in desperate circumstances. It might be ruthless to think that she wouldn’t find love. I don’t know how tough the times were in the 50s but from what I’ve seen, read and heard it was a different time for women so maybe this was her only chance and if it is her only chance then it’s not an ideal situation.

What really drew you to taking on this role?

I respected Sarah from the outset because it literally took me all day to read the three scripts, as there was so much detail in the stage directions. So from the off I was hooked. In the last scene there was a comedic element to Gwenda’s tragedy that was exactly to my taste. What line am I walking ‘am I a joke or am I tragic?’.

What is Gwenda’s relationship like with Rachel?

Rachel is the boss originally, a tough taskmaster and from a very privileged position and doesn’t identify with Gwenda, who is from a lower class than Rachel. Rachel looks down on Gwenda, is quite disdainful of her and maybe thinks she’s common but Gwenda doesn’t give a toss and says, “I’m going to have your husband and she does.” She gets her man but only through a series of quite severe events.

Does she genuinely have feelings for Leo?

She absolutely loves Leo. I think it is a genuine love affair between them because there are so many hurdles along the way. Gwenda is a complete human I couldn’t see a way in which this could work if she didn’t love the man. Certainly having all the stepchildren she is set to have (and none of them like her), she couldn’t enter into that relationship based on anything other than love.

What is her relationship like with Leo’s adopted children?

She definitely likes Tina and they’ve not had any difficult interactions; nor has she had any challenging interactions with Mickey so there’s no history there to worry about but Mary hates her. In that respect she has to deal with Mary but I don’t think it really matters to Gwenda – it’s just irksome. Hester is young and there’s indifference there as well, but there’s a jealousy from everyone because Leo’s such a magnanimous creature who has so much power and is the keeper of the love in the family. In that respect there’s a difficulty for anyone joining a family where there is an established way of doing things and children involved so it is particularly difficult for Gwenda.

What is Gwenda’s reaction to Arthur Calgary’s arrival?

When he first arrives she thinks he is there to help with the wedding, which is quite a funny scene. Then for Gwenda it becomes so much less about Arthur and what he is there to tell them than it is about her impending wedding which his presence can potentially ruin. It becomes very alarming and dangerous for her. He is an obstacle to be removed. He is also odd which jars with Gwenda who is very straight down the line in her life. She is a practical woman who sees Calgary as a very complicated character and she wants Leo to listen to her opinions of him.

What is it like to work with Bill Nighy and what does he bring to the character of Leo?

Bill brings everything to the role, he is a real charmer and as an elegant man himself he brought elegance to Leo.

Describe the era as reflected in the costumes you wear and how it helps you build the character?

Trisha (Biggar) has put such care and attention into the detail of the costumes. That period is such fun for me to play because I’m curvy. So she really fitted everything to my frame, which was incredibly helpful because I really wanted to have a relationship with the costumes and wear them as much as they wear you. I had a bikini scene that was such fun and very colourful and certainly the bikinis in the 50s were far more flattering for a figure like mine than they are now; much less revealing. The costumes were a real highlight and delight for me. With regards to my makeup and hair look it was fun to be a red head, quite freeing. I’ve been dark and blond but never red which has an otherness that I really enjoyed and helped me become Gwenda. She’s a fiery creature so it all helps.

Was everything on the page already in Sarah’s script or did you have to do any additional research for the part?

I always start with the script in the first instance but the most important relationship I have is the one with the director (Sandra Goldbacher). I definitely got into very detailed conversations with Sandra about where Gwenda had been and how she ended up in a room like this with very little income and all of the back story that brings her to the place that she finds herself in now. That’s all part of putting the story together.

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